Mary Church Terrell
Mary Church Terrell

#MaryChurchTerrell (1863-1954) was an American writer, lecturer, educator, and political activist. Born to former slaves who became successful entrepreneurs, Terrell was a dedicated and ambitious student from an early age. She became one of the first black women in the country to earn a Bachelor's degree. She followed this with a Master's in Education and began her career as a teacher shortly thereafter but she was forced to resign shortly after wedding her husband as married women were barred from working as teachers in Washington, D.C. Turning to political education, Terrell's passion for women's rights met a stonewall of racism within the women's suffrage movement. She mounted vocal opposition to this, asserting that the compounding binds of racism and sexism led to women "with ambition and aspiration [being] handicapped on account of their sex, but they are everywhere baffled and mocked on account of their race." Terrell was further driven to activism after the lynching of her close friend Thomas Moss. She first joined #FrederickDouglass in petitioning President Harrison to publicly condemn the act of terror (which the President refused to do) and then formed the Colored Women’s League. She went on to co-found the #NationalAssociationofColoredWomen, becoming the organization's first president. Terrell was a founder and chair of many organizations, but is perhaps best remembered as a charter member of the #NAACP. She was also deeply involved in local governance and served on the Board of Education in D.C. Terrell railed against gender and race discrimination through art as well, employing poetry, short stories, scholarly articles, and eventually an autobiography entitled "A Colored Woman in a White World" which eloquently and unflinchingly chronicles her struggles against sexism and racism.


#blackwomenshistorymonth #internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory #blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory#blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Lucy Parsons
Lucy Parsons

#LucyParsons (1853-1942) was an American activist, labor organizer, writer, and anarchist. She courageously broke unjust laws early on, ignoring anti-miscegenation statues which forbade marriage between whites and people of color (not struck down by the Supreme Court until 1967) and wedding her white husband, Albert. After Albert was fired from his job and blacklisted for organizing workers, Parsons opened a tailoring business and began hosting meetings for the International Ladies' Garment Workers Union (#ILGWU). Parsons would also publish a newspaper, Freedom, which railed against the lynching of black Americans and bore witness to the greed and dishonesty of sharecropping practices. She went on to become a founding member of the #IWW and the International Working People's Association (#IWPA). Parsons wrote extensively for publications such as The Socialist and The Alarm and is perhaps best remembered for her involvement in the #Haymarket tragedy. Nearly 200 police officers stormed a meeting of Chicago labor activists who had met to mobilize for an eight hour work day. Chaos ensued when an unidentified assailant threw an explosive into a crowd. Police responded by shooting indiscriminately, injuring and killing dozens of fellow officers and an unknown number of civilians. In the aftermath, Parsons, her husband, and several prominent anarchists (including some of whom were not in attendance) were arrested and charged for their political beliefs. Parsons was released but, despite a passionate nation-wide speaking tour to build support for his release, Albert was hanged. Parsons continued to deliver speeches that lifted up the causes that Albert gave his life for, proving herself to be a An unyielding advocate for workers, women, black folks, and poor people everywhere.

#blackwomenshistorymonth #internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory #blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Augusta Savage
Augusta Savage

#AugustaSavage (1892-1962) was a trailblazing American sculptor, educator, and activist. Closely associated with the #HarlemRenaissance, Savage began making sculptures from the dirt and clay she found around her as a child. She described how her father, a Methodist minister, “almost whipped all the art out of [her]" for creating "graven images." She began formal education at Cooper Union after she won a scholarship, completing a four year degree in three. After graduation, Savage went to work to support her family and received her first commission, a bust of #W.E.B.DuBois for the Harlem Library. The work was widely praised and led to commissions of other notables such as #MarcusGarvey. In 1922, her scholarship to study in France was rescinded when white students objected. Savage won another scholarship to the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Rome but lacked the money for travel and living expenses. Eventually a private foundation and fund raising parties thrown by her black community allowed Savage to enroll in prestigious Parisian school. There she won awards and toured Europe to research sculpture. In 1934 became the first black artist to be elected to #NAWA. She then launched a center where she fostered many promising students including #JacobLawrence. She went on open America's first gallery for black artists which closed soon after due to lack of sales. She is best known for her commission from the 1939 NY World's Fair "The Harp," a 16-foot-tall magnum opus in plaster. Despite being widely celebrated, the piece was destroyed at the close of the fair because Savage could not afford to cast it in bronze. A testament to the infuriating effects of institutionalized racism and sexism on her career, in 1988, the Schomburg Center mounted a retrospective of her work and only 19 pieces had survived.


#blackwomenshistorymonth #internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory #blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Audre Lorde
Audre Lorde

#AudreLorde (1934-1992) was a "self-described '#black, #lesbian, #mother, #warrior, #poet,' who dedicated both her life and her creative talent to confronting and addressing the injustices of racism, sexism, and homophobia. Her poetry, and 'indeed all of her writing,' according to contributor Joan Martin in Black Women Writers (1950-1980): A Critical Evaluation, 'rings with passion, sincerity, perception, and depth of feeling.' Concerned with modern society’s tendency to categorize groups of people, Lorde fought the marginalization of such categories as 'lesbian' and 'black woman,' thereby empowering her readers to react to the prejudice in their own lives. While the widespread critical acclaim bestowed upon Lorde for dealing with her [sexuality] made her a target of those opposed to her radical agenda, she continued, undaunted, to express her individuality, refusing to be silenced. As she told interviewer Charles H. Rowell in Callaloo: 'My sexuality is part and parcel of who I am, and my poetry comes from the intersection of me and my worlds… [White, arch-conservative senator] Jesse Helms’s objection to my work is not about obscenity…or even about sex. It is about revolution and change'" (text quoted from the Poetry Foundation's page on Lorde).

#blackwomenshistorymonth #internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory #blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Assata Shakur
Assata Shakur

#AssataShakur (b. 1947) is a legendary American activist, freedom fighter, author, poet, ex-political prisoner, and ex-political prisoner. Born Joanne Chesimard, Shakur later changed her name to #Assata ("she who struggles") #Olugbala ("for the people") #Shakur ("the thankful one"). A former member of both the #BPP and the #BLA, she came to national attention in a highly publicized and profoundly problematic trial, eventually escaping wrongful imprisonment and seeking asylum outside of the U.S. Creator of the fierce mantra/battle cry that has inspired countless fellow activists, she states:

"It is our duty to fight for our freedom.
It is our duty to win.
We must love each other and support each other.
We have nothing to lose but our chains."

 

#AssataTaughtMe #blackwomenshistorymonth
#internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth
#womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory
#blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Mary Church Terrell
Lucy Parsons
Augusta Savage
Audre Lorde
Assata Shakur
Mary Church Terrell

#MaryChurchTerrell (1863-1954) was an American writer, lecturer, educator, and political activist. Born to former slaves who became successful entrepreneurs, Terrell was a dedicated and ambitious student from an early age. She became one of the first black women in the country to earn a Bachelor's degree. She followed this with a Master's in Education and began her career as a teacher shortly thereafter but she was forced to resign shortly after wedding her husband as married women were barred from working as teachers in Washington, D.C. Turning to political education, Terrell's passion for women's rights met a stonewall of racism within the women's suffrage movement. She mounted vocal opposition to this, asserting that the compounding binds of racism and sexism led to women "with ambition and aspiration [being] handicapped on account of their sex, but they are everywhere baffled and mocked on account of their race." Terrell was further driven to activism after the lynching of her close friend Thomas Moss. She first joined #FrederickDouglass in petitioning President Harrison to publicly condemn the act of terror (which the President refused to do) and then formed the Colored Women’s League. She went on to co-found the #NationalAssociationofColoredWomen, becoming the organization's first president. Terrell was a founder and chair of many organizations, but is perhaps best remembered as a charter member of the #NAACP. She was also deeply involved in local governance and served on the Board of Education in D.C. Terrell railed against gender and race discrimination through art as well, employing poetry, short stories, scholarly articles, and eventually an autobiography entitled "A Colored Woman in a White World" which eloquently and unflinchingly chronicles her struggles against sexism and racism.


#blackwomenshistorymonth #internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory #blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory#blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Lucy Parsons

#LucyParsons (1853-1942) was an American activist, labor organizer, writer, and anarchist. She courageously broke unjust laws early on, ignoring anti-miscegenation statues which forbade marriage between whites and people of color (not struck down by the Supreme Court until 1967) and wedding her white husband, Albert. After Albert was fired from his job and blacklisted for organizing workers, Parsons opened a tailoring business and began hosting meetings for the International Ladies' Garment Workers Union (#ILGWU). Parsons would also publish a newspaper, Freedom, which railed against the lynching of black Americans and bore witness to the greed and dishonesty of sharecropping practices. She went on to become a founding member of the #IWW and the International Working People's Association (#IWPA). Parsons wrote extensively for publications such as The Socialist and The Alarm and is perhaps best remembered for her involvement in the #Haymarket tragedy. Nearly 200 police officers stormed a meeting of Chicago labor activists who had met to mobilize for an eight hour work day. Chaos ensued when an unidentified assailant threw an explosive into a crowd. Police responded by shooting indiscriminately, injuring and killing dozens of fellow officers and an unknown number of civilians. In the aftermath, Parsons, her husband, and several prominent anarchists (including some of whom were not in attendance) were arrested and charged for their political beliefs. Parsons was released but, despite a passionate nation-wide speaking tour to build support for his release, Albert was hanged. Parsons continued to deliver speeches that lifted up the causes that Albert gave his life for, proving herself to be a An unyielding advocate for workers, women, black folks, and poor people everywhere.

#blackwomenshistorymonth #internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory #blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Augusta Savage

#AugustaSavage (1892-1962) was a trailblazing American sculptor, educator, and activist. Closely associated with the #HarlemRenaissance, Savage began making sculptures from the dirt and clay she found around her as a child. She described how her father, a Methodist minister, “almost whipped all the art out of [her]" for creating "graven images." She began formal education at Cooper Union after she won a scholarship, completing a four year degree in three. After graduation, Savage went to work to support her family and received her first commission, a bust of #W.E.B.DuBois for the Harlem Library. The work was widely praised and led to commissions of other notables such as #MarcusGarvey. In 1922, her scholarship to study in France was rescinded when white students objected. Savage won another scholarship to the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Rome but lacked the money for travel and living expenses. Eventually a private foundation and fund raising parties thrown by her black community allowed Savage to enroll in prestigious Parisian school. There she won awards and toured Europe to research sculpture. In 1934 became the first black artist to be elected to #NAWA. She then launched a center where she fostered many promising students including #JacobLawrence. She went on open America's first gallery for black artists which closed soon after due to lack of sales. She is best known for her commission from the 1939 NY World's Fair "The Harp," a 16-foot-tall magnum opus in plaster. Despite being widely celebrated, the piece was destroyed at the close of the fair because Savage could not afford to cast it in bronze. A testament to the infuriating effects of institutionalized racism and sexism on her career, in 1988, the Schomburg Center mounted a retrospective of her work and only 19 pieces had survived.


#blackwomenshistorymonth #internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory #blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Audre Lorde

#AudreLorde (1934-1992) was a "self-described '#black, #lesbian, #mother, #warrior, #poet,' who dedicated both her life and her creative talent to confronting and addressing the injustices of racism, sexism, and homophobia. Her poetry, and 'indeed all of her writing,' according to contributor Joan Martin in Black Women Writers (1950-1980): A Critical Evaluation, 'rings with passion, sincerity, perception, and depth of feeling.' Concerned with modern society’s tendency to categorize groups of people, Lorde fought the marginalization of such categories as 'lesbian' and 'black woman,' thereby empowering her readers to react to the prejudice in their own lives. While the widespread critical acclaim bestowed upon Lorde for dealing with her [sexuality] made her a target of those opposed to her radical agenda, she continued, undaunted, to express her individuality, refusing to be silenced. As she told interviewer Charles H. Rowell in Callaloo: 'My sexuality is part and parcel of who I am, and my poetry comes from the intersection of me and my worlds… [White, arch-conservative senator] Jesse Helms’s objection to my work is not about obscenity…or even about sex. It is about revolution and change'" (text quoted from the Poetry Foundation's page on Lorde).

#blackwomenshistorymonth #internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory #blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

Assata Shakur

#AssataShakur (b. 1947) is a legendary American activist, freedom fighter, author, poet, ex-political prisoner, and ex-political prisoner. Born Joanne Chesimard, Shakur later changed her name to #Assata ("she who struggles") #Olugbala ("for the people") #Shakur ("the thankful one"). A former member of both the #BPP and the #BLA, she came to national attention in a highly publicized and profoundly problematic trial, eventually escaping wrongful imprisonment and seeking asylum outside of the U.S. Creator of the fierce mantra/battle cry that has inspired countless fellow activists, she states:

"It is our duty to fight for our freedom.
It is our duty to win.
We must love each other and support each other.
We have nothing to lose but our chains."

 

#AssataTaughtMe #blackwomenshistorymonth
#internationalwomenshistorymonth #womenshistorymonth
#womenshistory #womensherstorymonth #womensherstory
#blackwomensherstorymonth #blackherstorymonth #blackherstory #herstory #blackhistorymonth #blackhistory #blackwomen #blackfuturesmonth #blackfutures #black #women #history #blacklivesmatter #100daysofaction #100daysofresistance #resist

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